Not Egg-zactly Parenting, But…

Jen+Reid+and+her+egg+baby+Egglon+Musk+%28Photo+courtesy+of+Jen+Reid%29%0A
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Not Egg-zactly Parenting, But…

Jen Reid and her egg baby Egglon Musk (Photo courtesy of Jen Reid)

Jen Reid and her egg baby Egglon Musk (Photo courtesy of Jen Reid)

Jen Reid and her egg baby Egglon Musk (Photo courtesy of Jen Reid)

Jen Reid and her egg baby Egglon Musk (Photo courtesy of Jen Reid)

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Some like ‘em poached, some like ‘em scrambled, others like ‘em over easy.  Here at Warren Hills, the eggs are all hard boiled for the Health 11 Egg Baby Project, but they are as diverse as the students who carry them.

Every Health 11 class is given the same assignment: to care for a boiled egg for one whole week, without losing, cracking, or dropping it.

The assignment has become something of a right of passage and  has been around longer than some of the teachers themselves. Even Joseph Besser, one of the Health 11 teachers, isn’t sure exactly when it started.

“I began teaching at the high school in 99-2000 and some of the health teachers were already using a version of the egg baby project,” he said.

Most schools have their own version of the Egg Baby Project, sometimes using a bag of flour or a baby doll. However, according to Besser, the eggs are easier to grade.

“They are fragile and it’s easy to see if they are not treated properly,” he said. “Eggs are also cheaper as compared to other options and they don’t create too big of a mess.”

Every Health 11 class is given the same assignment: to care for a boiled egg for one whole week, without losing, cracking, or dropping it.

Students are required to create a container of sorts to protect their egg, and while some students simply use a Chinese take-out container, others use this opportunity to get creative.

Besser recalls a student that he had once who carried his egg in his hand the entire week. However he said of all his students’ egg baby carriers, “the most creative was a custom container with special foam that molded around the egg perfectly.”

Many students choose to name their eggs. Maya Slaven, for example, referred to her egg as Nelson, and Jen Reid’s baby was called Egglon Musk.

As enjoyable as the Egg Baby Project has become, the assignment teaches a very important lesson.

“ It’s a simulation of what it’s like to care for something that is very fragile,” Besser said. “Although this project is a far cry from all required parental duties, caring for the egg forces students to focus on something other than themselves.”